Category Archives: Safety

Don’t Skimp on the Safety Walkaround

At Tucker Paving, we take the safety of our workers and clients very seriously. One way we demonstrate this commitment is by conducting safety walkarounds. What is a safety walkaround? Glad you asked! A safety walkaround is basically a tour of the jobsite with the intention of finding and correcting any safety concerns.

The Safety Walkaround, Broken Down
There are three stages to a safety walkaround, and each stage plays an important part in the overall safety of the entire team. At Tucker Paving, we don’t believe in cutting corners, so when we do a safety check, we make sure it’s done right.

  1. Pre-inspection. Before starting any walkaround, it’s important to identify any areas of concern, plus schedule a time that will be convenient for any managers, officials, or safety committee members that should be involved. Make sure that any necessary equipment will be ready, and that you have the appropriate attire for the worksite.
  2. Inspection time. While doing the walkaround, keep a sharp eye out for things that be potential safety issues, such as tripping hazards, blocked exits, poorly maintained equipment, frayed or exposed electrical components, needless clutter, etc.
  3. Post-inspection. A report and abatement plan should be drafted soon after the inspection which includes a timeline for corrective actions to be taken. This should be shared with all involved parties and updated as improvements are implemented.

Better Safe Than Sorry
At Tucker Paving, we work hard to ensure our work is done on time, within budget, and safely. The well-being of our workers and clients is of paramount importance to us. When you need paving work done, trust Tucker Paving to get the job done right. Give us a call at (863) 294-1007 for an estimate, or email us at info@tuckerpaving.com for more information.

Do You Know OSHA’s COVID-19 Regulations?

A hundred years ago, American employees in construction often worked under dangerous conditions, and employers were under no legal obligation to take the safety of workers into consideration when assigning tasks. Fortunately, times have changed! In 1971, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established by the United States Department of Labor, and now we have rules and regulations that govern what is too risky for a worker to be exposed to. Tucker Paving takes the safety of all of our workers and partners very seriously and stays up-to-date on all safety standards.

OSHA Regulations for Construction
In the COVID era, health and safety are getting priority treatment. Like any other construction company, Tucker Paving is expected to protect the health of our employees and the public by minimizing potential exposure to the perilous virus. Here are some of the guidelines set forth by OSHA to protect us all:

  • Encourage workers to stay home if they are ill.
  • Allow the use of masks on the job site. 
  • As much as possible, advise employees to maintain appropriate social distance by allowing everyone at least six feet of personal space.
  • Promote hygienic activities like handwashing by providing either soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Use EPA-approved cleaning chemicals to sanitize shared equipment and spaces (such as portable toilet facilities) frequently.
  • Minimize in-person meetings and use good social distancing and sanitation protocols.
  • Encourage all workers to promptly report any health or safety concerns to the appropriate supervisor.

We Follow the Rules
At Tucker Paving, we know that no one wants to pick up a potentially deadly disease at work to take home to their families. We take the threat of coronavirus very seriously and work hard to make sure that all of our employees, and anyone else that we come in contact with, is as safe as possible. By working together, we can overcome this unprecedented challenge!

Protect Your Hands From Work Injuries

See the best ways to protect your hands while on the job, as hand injuries are very prevalent in the construction industry.

Hand injuries are a common occurrence in the construction industry. According to data from the CDC, hand injuries are responsible for more than 1 million visits to an emergency room each year by workers in the United States. Hand injuries can be costly both in time lost from work and medical costs. Additionally, hand injuries can also be debilitating, leaving those injured with only limited use—or even zero use—of their injured hand. Protecting your hands from work injuries is of the utmost importance.

Tips on Protecting Your Hands from Work Injuries

There are a number of different ways to keep from injuring your hands on a construction worksite, depending upon what line of construction work you are in.

  1. Wear Proper Gloves. Machinists, mechanics, carpenters, iron workers, welders, electricians, and more can all benefit from wearing gloves. Gloves protect your hands from being pinched, from picking up splinters from wood, from being cut by sharp metal, from being burned or chemically damaged, and more. With the variety and sophistication of gloves made specifically as PPE, there’s no reason not to wear them.
  2. Respect Power Tool and Machine Guards. Guards on power tools and machines are there for a reason, and removing or dismantling them can result in serious injury. Protect your hands and the rest of you by respecting the guards on power tools and machines. Don’t try to remove them or bypass them in any way, and always make sure the guards are present and functional before using a tool or machine.
  3. Pay Attention. While you may have performed a certain job or used a certain tool a hundred times without incident, that doesn’t mean you are safe from danger. Becoming complacent and not paying attention when running a saw, using a torch, or performing any number of jobs on a construction site is how you miss details that lead to injury.
  4. Pay Attention to Training and Seasoned Workers. Training is meant to protect you from injury, just like the advice of those workers with more job experience! Listen and follow the advice.

At Tucker Paving, safety is always our leading priority! We offer over 25 years of experience in the asphalt and concrete paving industry. We utilize our expertise for residential, commercial, and municipal clients. Contact us today by calling 863-299-2262, or fill out our contact form online, to let us know about your next concrete or asphalt paving project! 

Practicing COVID Safety in Construction

The COVID pandemic has reached into all aspects of our lives, and the construction industry is no exception. Safety should be the first priority on any construction worksite, and that includes taking measures to protect workers from COVID. See guidelines from OSHA on practicing COVID safety in construction, below.

COVID Safety Measures for Construction
While the job description and hazards for those working in carpentry, ironworking, plumbing, electrical, heating/ ventilation/air conditioning/ventilation, masonry and concrete work, utility construction work, and earthmoving work are different than non-construction industries, many of the safety measures companies should take to protect employees from COVID are very similar.

  • Create a Job Hazard Analysis as it pertains to Covid. OSHA advises to “Assess the hazards to which your workers may be exposed; evaluate the risk of exposure; and select, implement, and ensure workers use controls to prevent exposure.” It is most important to identify times and locations where workers will be in close proximity or will be touching the same tools, machinery, or controls repeatedly.
  • Train employees on the symptoms of COVID, how it is spread, the importance of social distancing and hygiene practices, and any other policies and procedures on reducing transmission of the virus that are applicable to each employee’s duties.
  • Implement standard operating procedures and employee training pertaining to social distancing, use of face masks, and for when a worker has contracted COVID.
  • Maintain as much space between workers as possible, such as through utilizing staggered work schedules, identifying “choke points” where workers are required to be closer than 6 feet, and creating procedures for limiting the number of people in those areas at a time. 
  • Keep in-person meetings, like toolbox talks and safety meetings, as short as possible, limiting the number of workers in attendance, and use social distancing practices.
  • Keep toilet and handwashing facilities clean and disinfected, including portable job site toilets. Make sure hand sanitizer dispensers are always filled. 
  • Disinfect items regularly that are frequently touched, such as doorknobs, light switches, tools, machinery and vehicle controls, and sink handles and toilet seats.
  • Have employees use higher-level PPE, like respiratory protection, if they are in settings where social distancing protocols cannot be followed. 

Safety is always our leading priority on any Tucker Paving job site. We have been in the asphalt and concrete paving industry for over 25 years! Contact us online, or call us at 863- 299-2262 for your next asphalt or concrete paving job! 

Understanding the Different Types of Hydroplaning

Hydroplaning is a jarring experience that includes the loss of control of a vehicle while in motion due to wet roads. It can oftentimes result in an accident when a driver loses control of the vehicle, and the vehicle crashes into another vehicle or a stationary roadway feature, like a guardrail or road sign. Many people think that hydroplaning only occurs at high speeds when there is a lot of water pooled on the roadway, but there are actually three different types of hydroplaning. Explore the different kinds of hydroplaning below to avoid losing control of your vehicle and stay safe on the road.

Different Types of Hydroplaning
Hydroplaning does always include a wet roadway, but the amount of water needed to cause the phenomenon to occur is not as much as you think.

Dynamic Hydroplaning. This is the hydroplaning that most people are familiar with. It happens when a vehicle’s tire is completely separated from the roadway by a layer of water while in motion. Usually, a tire’s tread moves water out and away from under the tire as the tire passes over, and some water moves through the cracks and crevices of the pavement, and the tires maintain full contact with the pavement. In dynamic hydroplaning, enough water stays under the tires so they lose contact with the pavement, which results in the loss of control of the vehicle. Dynamic hydroplaning most often occurs when a vehicle is traveling at 45 mph or faster.

Viscous Hydroplaning. This sort of hydroplaning is caused when a pavement is too smooth, either through polishing by traffic or when flushing occurs, which is when the asphalt—the viscous liquid that bonds the aggregates to form asphalt pavement—has bled up through the aggregates to cover large swaths of the pavements surface. Both scenarios mean the roadway’s pavement has too little micro-texture. It only takes a very small amount of water to cause viscous hydroplaning, because the water can’t escape into the texture of the roadway. Hydroplaning can occur at any speed with viscous hydroplaning.

Tire-Tread Rubber Reversion Hydroplaning. This hydroplaning is one experienced by 18-wheelers when the wheels lock up at high speeds on wet roadways that have good macro-texture but not enough micro-texture.

Other issues that contribute to hydroplaning include higher speeds, marginal tires, and low skid resistance. The best option is to reduce speeds when traveling on wet pavements!

Tucker Paving has over 25 years in the asphalt and concrete paving industry. Contact us online or call us at (863) 299-2262 to see how we can assist you with your next asphalt or concrete paving project.

Catch Potholes Early to Limit Damage

Repairing a pothole before it gets bad can protect not only motorists, but also pedestrians.

Potholes are one of the main problems Tucker Paving sees that lead to asphalt repair jobs. Potholes can form in roadways, parking lots, driveways, and more. They can wreak havoc on your vehicle, and they can also present a liability for business owners. Learn what causes potholes, the damage they can cause, and why fixing potholes early is so important. Continue reading Catch Potholes Early to Limit Damage

Safety Is the Top Priority at Tucker Paving

Safety for our team members is our first priority on every jobsite at Tucker Paving. There are hazards within a jobsite and outside a work zone that must be mitigated to ensure the end of the workday sees all team members heading home to families and loved ones. We follow protocols and rules set forth by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OHSA) to ensure our team members’ safety.  Continue reading Safety Is the Top Priority at Tucker Paving

Safety Tips for Driving Through Work Zones

Drivers should follow these tips when driving through construction and work zones to ensure everyone stays safe.

Nobody particularly likes driving through work zones, but taking care while sharing the road requires that drivers follow traffic and work zone rules so workers and drivers get home safely at the end of the day. At Tucker Paving, we are committed to on-the-job safety, and that includes situations when a job site includes road work. Continue reading Safety Tips for Driving Through Work Zones