Monthly Archives: May 2021

There’s More to Parking Lot Striping Than You Think

Parking lot striping, the process of painting a parking lot with the lines that mark parking spaces and other signage like handicapped parking and traffic lines, might seem like a simple process. However, there is a lot more to parking lot striping than you might think! Explore all of the details of parking lot striping that are crucial for the safety and functionality of a parking lot.

Parking Lot Striping Details
Parking lot striping is what tells drivers where (and where not!) to drive, where to park, and so on. Without adequate striping, a parking lot would turn into a free-for-all with drivers parking haphazardly and driving where they shouldn’t; this increases the danger of an accident involving both pedestrians and other vehicles. Parking lot striping keeps a parking lot as orderly and as safe as possible.

There is a lot of planning that goes into designing parking lot striping, such as how wide parking spots and driving lanes (called aisles) will be, if parking stalls will be slanted, straight, or parallel, the desired flow of traffic, choosing handicapped parking, and delineating areas for pedestrians.

Stripes in parking lots are four inches wide and 15 or 18 inches long, and it usually takes at least two coats of paint to create a stripe that is 15 milliliters thick so that it is bright, visible, and long-lasting. How parking lot stripers go about painting stripes in a parking lot will depend on whether they are painting a new layout, painting restripes, or painting resurfaced restripes.

The type of paint used is also important. Usually, parking lot stripers will use oil-based paint, called alkyd, for restripes and new layouts. Latex paint is most often used for parking lots that have been resurfaced, but latex can also be used for new layouts and restriping as well.

Parking stalls, or where vehicles are parked, are usually nine feet by 18 feet to accommodate all sizes of vehicles, but cities can have different zoning guidelines that must be followed. Furthermore, handicapped parking stalls must have a minimum of eight feet of clearance width-wise and have a minimum of five feet of clearance for an access way; again, these numbers may be different depending on the zoning requirements of different cities.

Aisles usually need to be 22 feet between straight parking stalls, but many parking lots utilize 24-foot aisles throughout the parking lot to offer sufficient clearance for vehicles to back out of parking spots. Angled parking stalls require aisles that are just 16 feet wide, but aisles have to be one-way. Lastly, parallel parking stalls need 22 feet of aisle if the traffic is two-way and 12 feet if traffic is one-way.

Tucker Paving has over 25 years of experience in the concrete and asphalt paving construction industry. We offer site clearing, site grading, stabilized subgrade, base work, asphalt paving, underground utilities, and concrete curbs, sidewalks, slabs, and tie-beams. Call us at?(863) 299-2262, or contact us online, for your next project!  

Keep ADA Rules in Mind During Construction and Alterations

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, and its requirements took effect in 1992. In short, the ADA requires that buildings such as public accommodations, commercial facilities, and local and state government facilities be built so that all individuals—regardless of their ability—are able to use a building with minimal impediment. Make sure you are constructing or remodeling your buildings and spaces to comply with ADA requirements or expect heavy consequences.

Complying With ADA Requirements
The purpose of the ADA is to give everyone equal access. Ensuring that your building or space provides equal access to those with handicaps is the right thing to do. It can also be costly to do otherwise. Fines can be between $55,000 to $75,000 for the first offense, and double that for additional offenses. Additionally, not complying with the ADA can leave you open to lawsuits.

There are many ADA requirements for commercial buildings, but some of the most common include:

  • Hardware on doors that everyone can access.
  • Public and company bathrooms that can be accessed by anyone.
  • Parking that is accessible to those with disabilities and have it labeled and enforced as such.
  • Wide door frames to allow wheelchairs to fit through.
  • Drinking fountains that are accessible to all.
  • Flooring that does not restrict or impede mobility.
  • Grab bars and railings in locations where they could be needed.
  • Handicap ramps and/or installing curb cuts; a building is required to have 60 percent of entrances and exits be accessible to those with disabilities.
  • Furniture and other furnishings, or any feature, that do not create barriers to receiving service.

Find the complete list of requirements in the ADA Checklist.

Tucker Paving has over 25 years of experience in the asphalt and concrete paving industry. We are very familiar with ADA requirements for residential, commercial, and municipal construction regarding sidewalks, curbs, and more. Contact us today by calling?(863) 299-2262, or fill out our contact form online, to let our experts handle your next paving project!